Categories
Handguns

Chiappa CBR-9 Black Rhino Pistol: New Personal Defense Handgun

Chiappa CBR-9 Pistol

On the heels of its PDW announcement earlier in the year, Chiappa Firearms has another new gun based on the same design. Called the CBR-9 Black Rhino pistol, the new handgun will officially roll out at the 2020 SHOT Show in Las Vegas.

The new pistol uses a steel “upper” receiver that holds all of the mechanical components save the ejector and magazine. Those parts are housed in the polymer lower receiver that also forms the pistol grip.

Chiappa uses a blowback system in the Black Rhino. According to the company, the system is “improved and efficient” with a bolt that is about 50% of the weight of competing products.

Chambered in 9mm, the gun uses proprietary 18-round magazines. The company stated the magazine design is a patented design that prevents the deformation of the feed lips for improved reliability. In other words, don’t expect to slip a 33-round Glock magazine into place.

Good news, however. The company suggests larger magazine capacities may be available at a later date. This would seem to be an obvious play on its part.

One of the most interesting aspects of this new pistol is the collapsible arm brace. Similar to the shoulder stock on the PDW, the arm brace can make this gun extremely compact for transport and provide the additional bracing for someone to shoot the gun more accurately with one hand.

Low profile fiber optic sights are standard, while a top Picatinny rail allows for the addition of a red dot or some other optic. There are also side rails for lights and additional gear.

A few years back, Chiappa introduced the AK-9. That was an AK-style pistol that fed from Beretta 92 magazines. The CBR-9 pistol looks far more refined.

The original personal defense weapon that the Chiappa CBR-9 pistol is based on was unveiled at the 2019 IWA Outdoor Classics trade show in Nuremberg, Germany. To my eye, the CBR-9 Black Rhino pistol bears a passing resemblance to the HK MP7 PDW. I’m not suggesting the one is a copy or clone of the other – just that they have a resemblance. Here’s hoping the Chiappa is more affordable than the HK.

Categories
Shotguns

New Chiappa CA612M Shotguns

new Chiappa 612M Field shotgun

New for 2016, Chiappa Firearms will officially introduce the new CA612M shotguns at the SHOT Show. There will be two versions of the gun at launch: the Field and the Turkey.

The new shotguns share a number of features, but are customized to the needs of different hunters. Both guns are chambered for the 3.5″ 12 gauge shell and are semi-automatic. The semi-auto system is an inertia driven system that is designed to eliminate some of the problems associated with gas systems.

Categories
Handguns

Chiappa AK-9 Pistol: Your Thoughts?

Chiappa AK-9

If you’ve ever wanted a blow-back AK-ish pistol chambered in 9mm that took Beretta 92 magazines, Chiappa has the gun for you!

Expected to be shown at the 2016 SHOT Show, the new AK-9 from Chiappa Firearms is a semi-automatic pistol that has the look of an AK-style pistol but is not likely to share much in common with those guns. The guns use a straight blowback action and are fed from Beretta 92 magazines. The gun ships with a pair of 10-round mags.

[Ed. note: Chiappa has a new PDW-style gun that is much more attractive than this pistol. Check out the new CBR-9 pistol.]

Chiappa equipped the pistol with a 6.3″ barrel. Overall, the gun is 14.25″ in length. Mechanical sights are included, though I suspect many people will prefer to add a red dot of some type using the built-in Picatinny rail. The rear sight is fixed, while the front is adjustable.

Speaking of accessory rails, the gun has one underneath the barrel as well as a pair at the 3 and 6 o’clock positions. The underside rail ends with a ramped hand stop. The side rails are high up on the gun and well above the barrel.

The AK-9 pistol appears to use an AK-style magazine release and safety selector. A swivel is attached to the rear of the gun for a sling.

If you are not familiar with Chiappa, they produce a number of reproduction guns. Many people may be familiar with the Rhino revolvers the company introduced a few years ago. Although the Rhino is a nice shooting gun (even in .357 Magnum,) it is very much a niche gun that does not enjoy widespread popularity. Well, besides being one of the guns used in the remake of Total Recall.

The suggested retail price on this gun is $569. Frankly, this gun doesn’t do anything for me. What about you – are you interested in it at all? Sound off in the comment section below. Just try to keep it PG, please.

Categories
news

Industry News

GILBOA SNAKE

News and information from around the firearms industry…

Gilboa Snake – A civilian legal version of the double-barrel AR-15 called the Snake is in development now.  This gun will have two triggers so that each action is independently controlled.  This is (presumably) done to avoid any problems with the BATFE and the National Firearms Act.  Currently, the company is expecting to have a limited quantity available in the fall of 2014.

Categories
news

Chiappa Rhino Revolvers

chiappa rhinoChiappa Firearms was showing off their new series of Rhino revolvers at the 2010 SHOT Show.  When you see the Rhino for the first time, you know that it is definitely a different revolver than what you have known previously.

The Rhino’s barrel is at the bottom, no the top, of the frame.  The cartridge in the bottom of the cylinder is the one that fires.  This design is supposed to reduce muzzle flip and enhance shooter comfort.

Four models of Chiappa were shown: a 2” DAO, 4”, 5” and 6”.  All models except the 2” have a Picatinny rail under the barrel for a white light or laser attachment.  All models except the 2” also have pinned front sights and adjustable rear sights.  The 2” Rhino has fixed sights.  All are chambered in .357 Magnum.

I have a few concerns about the Rhino.

First, the exposed “hammer” isn’t really a hammer.  It is used to manually cock the internal hammer into single action mode.  After you pull the “hammer” back,  it then falls back into the “down” position.  There is no way to know the gun is cocked and in single action mode.