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Mossberg 464 SPX Review – A Tactical Lever Gun that Delivers

Mossberg 464 SPX Review

Does the lever action gun still have a place for personal protection? In this Mossberg 464 SPX review, I answer that question.

Yes.

From hunting to protecting the homestead, the lever gun proved its worth in American hands time and time again. In the modern era, lever action rifles like this Mossberg do have a place.

In this review, I will show you how Mossberg equipped the rifle, how it performed and where it might fit for your protection needs.

Let’s not waste any time and dive right in.

The quick take:

The Mossberg 464 SPX rifle performed very well in testing. I had a small ergonomic issue with the lever safety, but the gun ran great. If you like the traditional approach of a lever gun but want one with the flexibility to customize for your needs, it might be right for you.

Mossberg 464 SPX

Lever action rifles have faithfully served lawmen, soldiers and ranchers alike.

Even so, I’m sorry to say that my first impression of the 464 SPX was that Mossberg jumped the shark with the tactical gear. Since I’ve had time with it, I’ve changed my tune.

Mossberg 464 SPX Tactical Rifle Review

Chambered for the classic .30-30 Win cartridge, the gun looks a little out of place with all of the modern furniture. From the A2-style muzzle device to the adjustable buttstock, the gun looks like it has been fitted with gear from my AR-15 spare parts box. For some reason, that rubs me the wrong way. Maybe I’m just a traditionalist.

Nevertheless, the gun is equipped with these things because they work. Isn’t that what we should be looking for in a “tactical” gun – performance over aesthetics?

The SPX is basically a 464 lever action rifle refitted to make it more suited for tactical purposes.

Muzzle Device on Mossberg 464 SPX

Mossberg shortened the barrel from 20″ to 16.25″ to make it more maneuverable. While they were at it, the company threaded the barrel. As it ships, the gun is fitted with an A2-style flash hider. However, you can easily replace this with a sound suppressor for safer shooting.

Working back from the muzzle, the synthetic forend is textured with grooves to give it a modern look as well as to improve your ability to grip it. Three short Picatinny-type rails are included on the forend at the 3, 6 and 9 o’clock positions. These rails make for perfect mounting points for a flashlight or weaponlight.

Weaponlight Mounted on the 464 SPX Lever Action Rifle

The hand grip is fitted with grooves that match those in the forend. Farther back is the adjustable, AR-style stock. My test gun had an ATI stock while the newer production models have a synthetic stock with a QD socket on each side for a sling.

On top of the gun is a set of fiber optic sights. The front sight is red while the rear 2-dot sights are green. They are quite bright in both outdoor and indoor settings. In dark conditions with little ambient light, they are harder to find.

Sights on Mossberg 464 SPX Rifle

A scope can be added to the receiver through the traditional drill and tap method. If you prefer a scout-style scope, XS Sight Systems makes a sight rail that installs forward of the receiver. This allows for the easy installation of a scope or red dot.

Specifications

caliber.30-30 Win
magazine capacity6 rounds
barrel length16.25"
weight7.0 pounds
sightsfiber optic 3-dot
finishmatte blued
stock6-postion adjustable
MSRP$574

Out on the range, I shot at varying distances to 100 yards with the sights. I’ve recorded how the different ammo performed in the gun below.

The gun met my expectations in terms of reliability. I had zero issues with loading, feeding or shooting. The lever action was smooth and had no hitches in the movement.

Recoil was moderate and on par with other .30-30 Win rifles. The ATI stock has a reasonably thick recoil pad that made a full day of shooting relatively comfortable.

ATI Stock on Mossberg Lever Action Rifle

The trigger pull was ok. While the break was crisp, there was quite a bit of take up before you got there. I felt almost no overtravel.

During shooting, I discovered that hand position on the rifle is critical. A plunger on the underside of the stock serves as a trigger safety. When you grip the rifle, the lever should depress the plunger and allow you to fire. However, there were several instances in which I failed to depress the lever far enough to disengage the safety.

Trigger Safety on Mossberg 464 SPX rifle

I suspect that my regular shooting of AR-style rifles created a typical hand positioning that is slightly different than what should be used with the 464 SPX. The safety is designed to prevent accidental discharges, but is a potential failure point for which you have to train.

Like other Mossberg long guns, there is a tang safety. Push it forward to fire and pull it back to put it on safe.

One thing I was surprised by was the weight of the gun. Unloaded, the gun weighs 7 pounds. Yet, it feels lighter when handled. I suspect the gun’s even balancing reduces the heavy feeling that an unbalanced rifle can relay. For homestead defense, it is possible that you may have to keep an intruder at gunpoint for an extended period of time. The balance and relatively light weight will make that easier for you.

Ammunition Performance

I tested the gun with three different loads: one each from Hornady, Remington and Winchester.

 

Velocity

Energy

Accuracy

Hornady LeverEvolution 160 gr FTX

2,231 fps

1,768 ft-lbs

2.5"

Remington Core Lokt 150 gr SP

2,232 fps

1,659 ft-lbs

5.5"

Winchester Super X 150 gr

2,191 fps

1,599 ft-lbs

3.5"

Performance measured with a Competition Electronics ProChrono Digital Chronograph at an approximate distance of 15' from the muzzle of the pistol. All measurements are an average of five shots.Accuracy measurements represent the best 5-shot group at 100 yards from a sandbag rest.

With the Hornady LeverEvolution, I was able to get the best 5-shot groups at 100 yards. They tended to range from 2.75″-3.25″.

Shooting the Winchester loads, I was able to get very consistent 3.75″-4″ groups. Unfortunately, the Remington Core Lokt load did poorly in this rifle. I shot groups up to 7″ wide with a best of only 5.5″

Mossberg 464 SPX Accuracy Testing

These are not the tiny groups you might expect with an AR, but keep in mind that I was shooting with the standard sights – no scope. Additionally, groups are 5-shots, not the three used by a lot of reviewers.

While the ballistics of a .30-30 Winchester cartridge suggest lower theoretical accuracy than a .223 Rem or .308 Win, I freely admit that the weak spot in the shooting is me – not the gun. Frankly, my eyes and hands aren’t as young as they used to be.

Does It Make Sense for You?

So, does the Mossberg 464 SPX make sense as a home defense weapon?

That depends on you and your needs.

Shooting the 464 SPX Review

For me, a rifle makes good sense. While I like shotguns, the fact is there are three other people in my house that may use the rifle for self-defense. While all of them can shoot a shotgun, the reality is I’m the only one who relishes the punishment a 12 gauge can dish out.

The lever action gun in .30-30 Win is a proven manstopper, yet it is easier on the shooter than a shotgun. In fact, the lever action rifle is even easier to run for most folks.

So, for my family, the Mossberg 464 SPX makes a lot of sense.

Does it replace an AR15?

Again, that depends on your needs and desires.

For many people, a quality AR will be a better choice. AR rifles tend to be a bit lighter in recoil and offer up to 30 rounds in a standard magazine. While I’d rather take a deer with a .30-30 than a .223, the fact is humans are easily stopped by both cartridges.

Beautiful Woman Shooting Mossberg Lever Action Rifle

While this shouldn’t be an issue in the US, the sad truth is you can be perceived in a better light by the criminal justice system by shooting an attacker with a lever gun that with a so-called “assault weapon.” Depending on where you live, this may be an important consideration.

If you’re not sure if a lever action rifle is right for you, you might want to check out Grant Cunningham’s article “I like all rifles, but lever actions have a particular place in my collection. Here’s why.

The Mossberg 464 SPX is a solid tactical lever action rifle. I do not hesitate in recommending it.

Disclosure

As with all of my reviews, I fully disclose any potential biases that may sway my opinion.

Mossberg provided the 464 SPX used in this review. It was a loaner gun that was returned after my testing was complete. The company did not offer me money or other consideration to write a review of this rifle. Nor are they an advertiser.

I have no financial interest in Mossberg or any other firearms manufacturer. All of the opinions in this review are my own.

Unlike many (most?) of the gun blogs and forums on the internet, GHG is not owned by a large corporation based in who-knows-where. It’s just me and my family with a few friends that pitch in from time to time.

GunsHolstersAndGear.com is a for-profit website. I do not charge readers a dime to access the information I provide.

Some of the links on this page and site are affiliate links to companies like Amazon and Palmetto State Armory. These links take you to the products mentioned in the article. Should you decide to purchase something from one of those companies, I make a small commission.

The links do not change your purchase price. I do not get to see what any individual purchases.

Questions about anything? Please ask in the comments section below. Also, if you’ve spent any time with this gun, please share your thoughts. Agree with me or not isn’t relevant. The more folks talking about their hands-on experience with the gun the better.

I just ask that you keep things civil and free of profanity. I want this to be a family-friendly site.

Categories
Handguns

Mossberg MC1sc – A New 9mm Pistol with 100 Year Roots

Mossberg MC1sc Pistol

Ahead of the 2019 SHOT Show, Mossberg announced a new pistol: the MC1sc.

The Mossberg MC1sc is a subcompact 9mm handgun that is designed for the concealed carry and self-defense markets. It offers a range of features that make it worth considering.

The Basics

One hundred years ago, O.F. Mossberg & Sons opened its doors and started selling firearms. The first gun it offered was a handgun called the Brownie – a .22 caliber pistol with four barrels that looked similar to, but operated differently from, some pepperbox pistols of the era.

Fast forward from 1919 to 2019 and Mossberg has become the 6th largest firearm manufacturer in the United States. Even though the company is better known for its shotguns and rifles, it returned to its handgun roots with the new MC1sc pistol.

The MC1sc is a striker-fired, polymer-framed handgun that is an obvious candidate for concealed carry duty. Three years of development and testing suggest the engineers have had ample opportunity to work all of the bugs out of the new design.

Shooters may wonder if the “sc” in the name stand for “subcompact.” It does. Using this naming convention makes one wonder what else may be in the pipeline. Also, this gun is chambered in 9mm only. Other caliber options may also be in the works.

The MC1sc or MC1 subcompact is relatively small and lightweight. It has a 3.4″ barrel, and with an empty magazine, it weighs a little more than one pound.

Today’s shooter has a broad selection of subcompact pistols from which to choose. Mossberg seems to have recognized this as the company attempts to differentiate itself with a number of features such as:

  • Clear-Count Magazines: Mossberg uses Clear-Count magazines with translucent bodies that allow the shooter the ability to quickly assess round count. According to the company, the magazine bodies are made from a “lubricious polymer compound” that offers very good wear resistance and low friction. Mossberg also states the floor plates are easy to remove. Bright red followers also help owners quickly ID when a magazine is completely unloaded.
  • Mossberg STS: One of the complaints I’ve heard about Glock pistols relates to the need to depress the trigger to field strip the pistol. While I don’t feel the complaint has much merit, I recognize that perception is reality for most consumers. So, I completely understand Mossberg’s use of the STS, or Safe Takedown System, that negates the need for a trigger press to disassemble the pistol.
  • DLC Finish: Diamond-like carbon coatings (DLC) have become quite popular for shooters that want excellent wear and corrosion resistance on their firearms. Mossberg uses a black DLC as standard to reduce wear and improve durability of the MC1sc. Both the barrel and slide have a DLC finish.
  • Flat Faced Trigger: Mossberg uses a flat faced trigger with a blade trigger safety. The company states the trigger pull weight is between 5 and 6 pounds.

Mossberg includes two magazines with each pistol: a flush fitting 6-round magazine and an extended 7-round magazine. Additional features include 3-dot sights, an oversized trigger guard, reversible magazine release button and forward slide serrations.

CONFIRMATION: A Mossberg representative confirmed that the MC1sc will feed from Glock 43 magazines.

Specifications & Variations

At launch, there are five different versions of the MC1sc that can be purchased.

Standard MC1sc Specifications
caliber9mm
magazine capacity6 (flush), 7 (extended)
weight19 oz unloaded
barrel length3.4"
overall length6.45"
action/firing systemstriker-fired
sights3-dot
finishmatte black
MSRP$421.00

A variation of the basic model is a version with a cross bolt safety. This safety is located on the frame and directly behind the trigger. I wonder how well this configuration works as it looks like a shooter’s trigger finger may activate or deactivate the safety simply by grasping the gun. This variation is otherwise identical to the basic MC1sc pistol.

If the standard 3-dot sights aren’t ideal for you, Mossberg offers two other aiming options. The first has a set of Truglo Tritum Pro sights installed.

The second optional sighting system leaves the basic 3-dot sights in place, but adds a Viridian E-Series laser unit. This unit attaches to the front of the trigger guard and uses a red aiming laser.

The final variation is the Centennial Limited Edition MC1sc. Recognizing the company’s 100th anniversary, this is a limited run of 1000 pistols with sequential serial numbers. It features 24k gold accents on the engraved slide and a titanium nitride finish on the barrel and other metal parts.

Pricing

Mossberg aims to keep this gun affordable. The basic models have a suggested retail price of $421. This beats the wildly popular Smith & Wesson M&P Shield 2.0 by more than $50. It is, however, priced more than $100 above the Ruger EC9s pistols.

Stepping up to the model with the Truglo Tritium Pro sights, the suggested retail price increases to $526. If you opt for the Viridian laser sight with standard 3-dot sights, the price is $514.

As one might expect, the limited edition gold plated pistol is the most expensive at $686.

Holsters

When the gun launched, several companies announced concealed carry rigs that are made for the guns. Since then, more companies have announced fits. See our full list of Mossberg MC1sc holsters here.

Final Thoughts

It will be interesting to see what the public’s response to this new gun will be. A gun designed for personal protection must be reliable. For it to be a commercial success, however, it has to feel good in the hand and look good enough to catch people’s attention.

The use of “sc” to indicate “subcompact” certainly suggests that a MC1 or MC1c might also be in development. If this gun sells well enough, Mossberg may have an entire line of pistols on the market by this time next year.

In my experience, Mossberg makes quality firearms. So, I have high expectations for how well this gun performs. Time will tell.

Update: Brownells is now selling these guns here.

Categories
news

Mossberg Now Selling AOWs

Mossberg 590A1 Compact Cruiser AOW

O.F. Mossberg & Sons is the latest manufacturer to jump into the deep end of the pool with NFA weapons. We’ve seen other major companies like Ruger start selling suppressors, and now Mossberg is offering 12 gauge AOWs.

Categories
Shotguns

Mossberg L Series Shotguns – Left Handed

Left Handed Mossberg 590 Shotgun

At the SHOT Show, Mossberg announced a new line of left-handed shotguns called the L Series. These shotguns replicate many of the standard (right-handed) 500 and 590 series shotguns in the Mossberg catalog in both 12 and 20 gauge.

Here’s the full information…

Categories
Rifles

New Mossberg Patriot Rifles

Mossberg Patriot rifle

Mossberg will introduce a new line of bolt-action rifles at the SHOT Show called the Patriot. The new Mossberg Patriot rifle line is possibly the most complete line of guns ever introduced at one time: more than 50 models are in the initial release.

And…there is a reason for the vast number of rifle options at the introduction. Mossberg will progressively eliminate both the ATR and 4×4 lines as the Patriot rifles are introduced.

The line-up includes guns with wood and synthetic stocks, short- and long-actions, youth editions and scoped packages.

Let’s take a look at what is being introduced…